US Senator

Candidates are listed in the order in which they appear on the ballot. 

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Matthew Corey

Republican Party 

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Christopher S Murphy

Democratic Party

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Richard Lion

Libertarian Party

Jeff Russell

Green Party

Representative In Congress

Candidates are listed in the order in which they appear on the ballot. 

Jim Himes

Democratic  Party 

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Jim was a businessman and non-profit executive, and provides thoughtful, independent representation to Connecticut’s 4th District. He fights for economic opportunity for all, focusing on transportation infrastructure and improving our schools. He serves on the Financial Services and Intelligence Committees and is a father to two remarkable women. 

Harry Arora

Republican  Party, Independent Party

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Harry Arora is a successful entrepreneur and a first-generation immigrant American. Harry is running on a platform to promote policies which will reverse Connecticut’s economic decline. Harry has an MPA from Harvard University, MBA from UT-Austin, and an electrical engineering degree from India. Harry lives in Greenwich with his family.


Immigration legislation has been stalled in Congress. Which initiatives would you support to deal with this issue?

Himes (D)

Our nation’s immigration system is in dire need of reform. Immigrants strengthen our nation and our economy and I will fight the inhumane politics of bigotry and family separation coming from the Trump White House. I will support comprehensive reform that secures our border, stops the illegal employment of the undocumented, and offers a rigorous path to citizenship for those undocumented immigrants who are here and who have followed our laws, remained employed and paid their taxes. I support and have fought for legislation to normalize the status of Dreamers.

Arora (R, I)

We truly need immigration reform – one that respects our values and allows us to attract the best and brightest as well as give refuge to those fleeing oppression. We need to have immigration laws which can be implemented fairly without making a mockery of the rule of law as is the case now – hard working immigrants with graduate degrees from US schools are being sent back while those who break laws are being advocated for. I would support an initiative for reforming immigration which balances between merit, work, refuge and family reunification.


Do you think the current gun control laws are adequate to ensure citizen safety? Please explain your position.

Himes (D)

Nearly 40,000 Americans die every year from suicides, accidents and brutal crime at the point of a gun. No other nation has a similar problem. I support commonsense gun safety measures like universal background checks, limits on magazines and assault weapons and the pursuit of safe gun and safe storage technologies, all of which are consistent with the 2nd Amendment. We also need to do a better job of providing mental health interventions to the addicted, the depressed and others who might consider suicide. 

Arora (R, I)

Our objective for gun laws should be to ensure reduction or elimination of gun violence and acts of terrorism. The implementation of an effective universal background check is required and currently the implementation of the system is patchy and inadequate. We need to make sure that guns do not get into the wrong hands of criminals and those with mental health issues. More needs to be done there. We also need to work immediately to improve school security.


The US has withdrawn from several multi member international agreements. Do you favor renegotiations of these agreements and what conditions would you support?

Himes (D)

The Trump administration has removed the United States from the Paris Climate Agreement, the Iran Nuclear Deal and is threatening to pull back from the alliances that have been the bedrock of global stability in the post-World War Two era such as NATO. These withdrawals are not signals of strength. True strength comes through full engagement with and leadership of the international community. Our alliances and agreements give us leverage when dealing with allies and rivals alike and we should reenter into negotiations to strengthen our position and restore some of our international standing and make the world safer. 

Arora (R, I)

The US has withdrawn from international agreements which have served neither the US interest nor the larger public interest. The Paris Agreement with ‘variable unverifiable commitments’, NAFTA with its loopholes and imbalance and JCPOA with its lack of longer term solution to Iran’s nuclear weaponization all have one thing in common - these agreements were all done without respect for the US strength or US commitment to peace, climate and trade. Yes, I support renegotiation to reflect real progress and real solutions and which serve the American people and truly serve the global purpose.

State Senator - District 26

Candidates are listed in the order in which they appear on the ballot.


Toni Boucher

Republican  Party, Independent Party

Will Haskell

Democratic  Party 

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Will Haskell is the Democratic candidate for State Senator in the 26th district. Will graduated from Westport Public Schools and Phi Beta Kappa from Georgetown University, and he now lives in New Canaan. He believes the values of this community—equality, justice and respect—are sadly lacking in Hartford. 

In Washington, Will worked for the Democratic National Committee, where he analyzed state legislation and fought to protect the right to vote. He also assisted the Community Tax Aid program, lending a hand to low-income residents as they filed their taxes. Since March, Will has been campaigning throughout the seven towns of the 26th district, speaking to voters while knocking on more than 4,000 doors. He was inspired to run by President Barack Obama’s words, “If you’re disappointed by your elected officials, grab a clipboard, get some signatures, and run for office yourself.” 

Toni Boucher holds leadership positions in both the public and private sectors. Chief Deputy Leader in the Connecticut State Senate following twelve years as State Representative and Assistant Minority Leader, Toni is recognized as a state policy thought leader and spokesperson. Toni has developed model legislation in the areas of tax policy, finance, transportation, education, higher education, and best practices in nonprofit governance.

A Director at a Connecticut Institutional Asset Management firm.  Contributing to the publication, research, education and professional development for clients and broader nonprofit community, and co-authored the Institute’s white paper on Ethics and Nonprofits.  

Toni served as Wilton Board of Education Chair, member of the Connecticut State Board of Education, Selectman, executive positions with General Electric and UAL/Westin International, co-founder of a high tech and bio science marketing design agency and co-founder of a mainframe software maintenance company.
 A child emigrant from Italy, she became a naturalized citizen at 10 years old in Connecticut. Toni has an MBA from University of Connecticut and held series 7, 63, and 31 investment brokerage licenses. 


What specific measures would you propose to balance the state budget? Please list up to three.

Haskell (D)

For too long Connecticut’s future has been burdened by yesterday’s mistakes. First, it’s time to elect legislators who are serious about addressing Connecticut’s pension liabilities. Instead of kicking the can down the road, I support the Legacy Obligation Trust Model. This innovative approach would take a portion of Connecticut’s underutilized state assets and allow them to become profitable under an independently managed trust. 

Next, I support a transportation lockbox. For too long, Hartford has broken its promise to voters by failing to invest in long-term infrastructure improvements. A lockbox would ensure that every dollar taxed for transportation purposes is actually spent on improving our infrastructure. 

Connecticut needs more taxpayers — not more taxes. Our budget process is broken, with one committee raising revenue and a separate committee determining appropriations. I’m ready to bring compassion and resolve to the tough decisions that lie ahead.

Boucher (R, I)

 Pension, wage, and healthcare reform:
- Enroll state employees in a 401k in lieu of state defined pension benefit
- Health insurance copays for state employees should be increased by 25% and an annual deductible of $2,000 per individual and $4,000 per family
- Eliminate duplications and end non-essential programs
- Benchmark state employee wages with surrounding states
- Overtime income and longevity should not be included in pension calculations
- Pensionable income should be capped
- State employee pension benefits should be determined on five year look back instead of three
- State employee pension contributions should be increased
- Assumed rate of return for the state employee retirement system should be no more than 5%
- Cost of living increases for state employee pensions should  be suspended if there is a budget deficit
- Reform collective bargaining for state employee benefits (1/3 of budget goes to salaries and benefits are $10,000 per year higher than MA and $5,000 more than NY) Model after local municipal employee contracts.

What would you do to make Connecticut a more attractive state for new businesses to open in and for established companies to remain or move in?

Haskell (D)

We can’t revitalize Connecticut for the next twenty years by trying to recreate the last twenty. It’s time to move this state forward. First, let’s create a tax incentive for graduates of Connecticut colleges and universities to stay here and begin their careers in Connecticut. Slashing corporate taxes in the hopes that major businesses keep their headquarters here hasn’t worked. It’s time to give tax breaks to recent graduates and young families who could use just a little boost in order to stay in Connecticut. Second, let’s invest in fixing our trains, roads and bridges. Connecticut’s crumbling infrastructure is a deterrent to workers and businesses alike. A thriving economy must allow people to get to and from the office without sitting in traffic or waiting for a delayed train. Third, it’s time for Paid Family Leave. Young workers increasingly consider work-life balance when choosing where to buy a home and start a family. Paid Family Leave, financed by employee contributions, would provide workers with the flexibility they need to advance in their career without burdening businesses.

Boucher (R, I)

It’s imperative we move towards cutting business and payroll costs, shorten the state permitting process, reduce burdensome regulations, remove the prevailing wage mandate and apply designated financial resources to road and rail improvements thus reducing commuting time.  
 
Develop and cultivate a highly trained work force by partnering with business and aligning the educational system with skills needed by manufacturing and emerging companies in areas of advanced engineering, cybersecurity, Artificial Intelligence, renewable energy solar/fuel cells, STEM, medical devices and material science.
 
Instead of quick unsustainable solutions like a casino in Bridgeport – let’s eliminate property taxes in Blighted areas of our inner-cities spurring business Innovation clusters – thus creating a pro-business ecosystem of growth and real life change. 

Cost of living is out of reach for many, to attract and retain companies and their employees we need to cut and overhaul taxes. Phase out the income tax, eliminate death tax/gift tax immediately, phase out social security and pension taxes - bring jobs and people back to Connecticut, halt net migration of jobs and people! 

State Senator - District 28

Candidates are listed in the order in which they appear on the ballot.

Tony Hwang

Republican  Party, Independent Party

Michelle Lapine McCabe

Democratic  Party, Working Families Party

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Michelle Lapine McCabe, a Fairfield County native and Fairfield resident for the past fourteen years is determined to improve the outlook for the State she calls home. A graduate of Vassar College, BA, and the University of Texas - Austin, MA, she received degrees in Art History and Criticism from both Universities. After years of museum work, Michelle returned to Connecticut to start a family. In 2007, as a well established member of the Fairfield community, her passion for local agriculture and student health led her to join a newly formed PTA Council Committee, Fuel for Learning Partnership. The following year she became Chair and, during her three year term, successfully advocated for an increase in the “from scratch” cooking and healthy options for school meals. Michelle ran the Food For Thought Expo with dedicated school volunteers from around the district that highlighted local food, healthy eating, and school food improvements. Her advocacy led her to a position at the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity. Over a three year period at Yale, Michelle worked on policy briefs and recommendations, built a parent advocacy program, served on the Governor’s Agriculture Council, and held leadership roles with the Connecticut Food System Alliance. 

In 2013 Michelle began working with the Council of Churches of Greater Bridgeport. Since then she has grown and redefined the program known now as the Center for Food Equity and Economic Development, FEED. The expanded mission includes working with food pantries and community meal programs, offering a culinary training program for workplace and food business development, running a shared use commercial kitchen space, and management of a prepared food line made from recovered produce. As the FEED Center Director, Michelle oversees and nurtures the physical and financial health of many of the most vulnerable residents in the Bridgeport area. Her decision to run for State Senate ties directly to her vast experience working in policy and nonprofit programming. Michelle has demonstrated a significant ability to make systemic changes, with limited resources, to build coalitions while staying laser focused on getting the results necessary to guarantee success. This established skill-set is exactly what Michelle will employ to lead Hartford and Connecticut towards the bright future which lays ahead for Connecticut. 

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Senator Tony Hwang represents Connecticut’s 28th Senate district. Hwang was born to parents that escaped Communist China as teens and lived under martial law in Taiwan. Tony spent his early years in America living in a federal housing project and attending public school, learning English as a second language. Through personal persistence, inspired by the sacrifices his parent made and motivated by the supportive teachers who believed in him, Hwang successfully attended and graduated from Cornell University. 
Hwang represented the 134th House district from 2009-2014. In 2014, Hwang became the first Asian-American state senator in General Assembly history. 
Hwang’s mission has always been defined by his “commitment to the community”. He strives to practice representative government with a common sense approach reflecting the needs and wants of the people he represent. He hopes to earn your vote for re-election based on his proven record of service and accomplishments. 

COMMITTEES: 
Housing - Chairman 
Aging - Vice Chairman 
Energy and Technology - Vice Chairman 
Judiciary - Member 
Planning and Development - Member 


What specific measures would you propose to balance the state budget? Please list up to three. 

McCabe (D, WF)

Connecticut needs additional revenue in order to address our pension liabilities and continued investment in education, infrastructure and quality of life for residents. We need new and more taxpayers coming into Connecticut in order to balance our budget. My primary focus as a senator would be to bring more business and residents to Connecticut in order to expand the tax base. Second, I would look into new sources of revenue, such as legalization of recreational marijuana and tolls in order to bill out of state drivers for the use of our roads. Third, I would address unfair pricing in the pharmaceutical industry as a means of lowering prescription drug costs. 

Hwang (R, I)

Fiscal accountability is needed to reduce government spending and ease the tax burden on CT families. 3 measures that will help to balance the state budget: 

1. We need to address pension and benefit reform. CT has one of the most generous state employee benefits agreement in the country. The exponential rise of unfunded pension liabilities and health insurance costs, the existing trajectory is simply not sustainable. We are asking for fairness and shared sacrifice. 

2. We need to eliminate dual delivery (nonprofits vs. government) of our social services. Our nonprofits have demonstrated the ability to deliver the same services- with the same standards and quality - at a significantly lower cost than governmental agencies. The dual delivery system is simply not sustainable. 

3. Finally we need to bring innovation and shared best practices from the private sector to governmental agencies to deliver efficiencies and reduce cost. We need to review governmental practices to determine where to implement technological solutions to identify bureaucratic waste and eliminate redundancies.


What would you do to make Connecticut a more attractive state for new businesses to open in and for established companies to remain or move in?

McCabe (D, WF)

A skilled workforce is a strong driver for businesses to locate in a given place and quality of life is what supports a skilled workforce. I would explore gaps in the market that Connecticut is poised to fill given our resources in higher education, technology, and complementary industries that already are located here. I would look to develop a private-public partnership to create a student loan forgiveness program for graduates who work in Connecticut in order to encourage young people to stay or locate to CT. I would support transit oriented development, which is attractive to younger people, provides affordable housing options, and addresses congestion. To support small businesses and their workforce challenges, I would institute a year grace period for low-income residents receiving government support when they take on new employment. During the year period, new employees would continue to receive the same level of benefits without an asset cap to provide small business with a stable workforce and alleviate risk for low-income individuals in their career development.

Hwang (R, I)

Jobs and economic growth are essential to CT’s future success. In order to keep and attract business in Connecticut, we need to reduce the cost of doing business in the state. We need to reduce the regulatory burden and punitive tax regimen that adversely impacts small and mid-size businesses. We also need to address the business energy costs that are one of the highest in the country by increasing the usage of renewable and alternative energy resources. 

Creating a commercially attractive ecosystem encompassing education, housing and entrepreneurial collaboration will draw new businesses and talent to our state. To that effect, we need to nurture innovative technologies such as bioscience, genomics, renewal energy and advanced manufacturing within our state. We need to renew our commitment to education excellence to develop a highly trained workforce that companies need to succeed. Businesses rely on CT’s transportation and infrastructure to support them, which means we need to establish a viable and realistic long term strategy such as private/public partnerships to address the challenges in transportation and infrastructure improvements.


State Representative - District 136

Candidates are listed in the order in which they appear on the ballot. 

Greg Kraut

Republican  Party, Independent Party

Jonathan Steinberg

Democratic  Party 

* Serving fourth term as State Representative, representing Westport: 
- Chair, Public Health Committee 
- Chair, Pension Sustainability Commission 
- Leader of Moderates Caucus within House Democrats 
- Former Chair, M.O.R.E. Commission 
- Former Chair, Transportation Bonding Subcommittee of the Finance Committee 
- Former Vice-Chair, Energy & Technology Committee 
- Former member, Constitutional Spending Cap Commission 
- Former member, Shoreline Resilience Taskforce 
* Elected four times to Westport’s RTM: 
- Elected Deputy Moderator three times (unanimously) 
- Former Chair of Health & Human Services; Library, Museum & the Arts, and IT Committees (five years on Education Committee) 
* 20+ years marketing/communications executive in consumer healthcare, including Bristol-Myers, Revlon, and Mount Sinai Hospital 
* 40+ years Westport resident 
* Graduated Westport schools: 
- Hitchcock Nursery School 
- Hillspoint Elementary School 
- Coleytown Junior High (now Coleytown Middle School) 
- Staples; Class of 1974 
* B.A., Yale University, Class of 1978 [Member, Yale Whiffenpoofs] 
* M.B.A. with Honors, NYU Stern School of Business, Class of 1986 
* Returned with wife Nancy to Westport in 1996; daughters Rachel, Margot and Charlotte graduates of Westport schools 

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Twenty years of experience in real estate management and asset management, advising companies, creating jobs and solving financial problems. Proven record of reviving neighborhoods. Elected member of Westport’s Representative Town Meeting (RTM), serving on the Finance, Planning and Zoning and Employee Compensation committees. Founder of a mentorship program for adults with special needs, youth sports coach, and real estate leadership board of B’nai B’rith. Recipient of numerous awards and honors, including the AISH Center Leadership Award for a high standard of professional ethics, a three-time recipient of Commercial Observer’s “Top 100” list, and Moms Demand Action Gun Sense Candidate Distinction. Husband and father of two sons in Westport public schools.


What specific measures would you propose to balance the state budget? Please list up to three. 

Steinberg (D)

* Mitigate the huge unfunded pension liability for teachers and state workers, which is strangling the state budget year after year, through initiatives like the Pension Sustainability Commission, of which I am the Chairman. We’re looking at donation of select state real estate assets to an independent trust which will optimize the asset’s value and dedicate the proceeds to work down the unfunded liability. 
* Reform the estate tax, business taxes, and other nuisance taxes so that residents and businesses commit to staying and prospering in CT, ultimately increasing revenues to balance the budget. But ending the Income Tax would be disastrous to state budget solvency. 
* Open new negotiations with state worker unions to achieve further concessions on pension and healthcare benefits based on a new “shared risk” model, which is proving effective in Canada and is being considered by other states. Pensioners benefit when Government does well and has the funds to disperse, but the state won’t be tied to automatic raises or other unaffordable benefits.

Kraut (R, I)

Besides my 21-point economic recovery plan which can be viewed at gregkraut.com, these three specifics, easily implementable ideas would generate revenue and lower expenditures without raising taxes: 

1. Sell and lease back state-owned and occupied commercial office space, which could immediately generate up to $1 billion in revenue. The federal government and our top corporations have implemented this strategy for several years. 
2. Renegotiate public sector pension plans, as Westport has done. Modest reforms, like reductions in COLAs, immediately reduce annual pension funding costs, reducing budgeted expenditures. 
3. Eliminate up to $1 billion of wasteful spending per the auditor’s reports. 


What would you do to make Connecticut a more attractive state for new businesses to open in and for established companies to remain or move in?

Steinberg (D)

* Prioritize investment in rail and road infrastructure, bringing CT into the 21st century. 
o The truth is that trains won’t get faster until the Federal Railroad Administration lifts current speed restrictions. In the meantime, we must focus on upgrading tracks, catenaries, and stations. OK, expand WiFi, too! 
o We need improvements to I-95, including congestion pricing, to move traffic more efficiently and make CT an attractive place for new business investment. We must also find necessary funding to fix deteriorating roads and bridges. 
o Implement tolls to capture out-of-state driver revenue, coupled with a constitutional lockbox, to assure adequate transportation funding. 
* Establish state budget discipline and accountability, like zero-based budgeting and greater transparency, to bolster confidence in the State’s ability to meet its obligations and send the right signals to the business community and markets. 
* Create business “ecosystems” for growing industry clusters like bioscience and green tech by facilitating quality transit/housing infrastructure and attractive amenities, and assist small businesses in finding/training skilled workers and sourcing grants/loans needed for expansion and job growth.

Kraut (R, I)

1. Reform the tax code to encourage private companies and high earners to remain in the state by exempting retirement income from taxation and lowering the top marginal tax rate.
2. Forgive student debt for residents to attract and retain an educated younger workforce.
3. Establish an Economic Development Corporation to incentivize employers to bring high paying jobs to Connecticut.
4. Fund a comprehensive ten-year infrastructure improvement plan to fix ailing trains and highways. 1. Reform the tax code to encourage private companies and high earners to remain in the state by exempting retirement income from taxation and lowering the top marginal tax rate.
2. Forgive student debt for residents to attract and retain an educated younger workforce.
3. Establish an Economic Development Corporation to incentivize employers to bring high paying jobs to Connecticut.
4. Fund a comprehensive ten-year infrastructure improvement plan to fix ailing trains and highways. 

State Representative - District 143

Candidates are listed in the order in which they appear on the ballot.

Gail Lavielle

Republican  Party, Independent Party

Stephanie Thomas 

Democratic  Party, Working Families Party

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Stephanie is a small business owner who has spent nearly 30 years as a fundraising consultant advising and problem solving for nonprofit organizations. She has first-hand experience with the working poor, homeless, disadvantaged students, and many others left behind when government does not work to strengthen all its members. A natural leader and consensus builder, Stephanie is prepared to be a champion for everyone to build a stronger, fiscally solvent, and more equitable Connecticut.
After the 2016 Presidential election, Stephanie downsized her business to get more involved locally. As your state representative, Stephanie will be proactive and fight for legislation to protect voting rights, gun safety, a woman’s right to choose, and affordable college. She has been endorsed by Moms Demand Action, the Working Families Party, and NARAL.
Stephanie is no stranger to hard work. Growing up poor, she helped to support her family and worked to put herself through NYU and has a Masters in Nonprofit Management. Stephanie lives with her husband Greg in Norwalk and is a member of the Democratic Town Committee.

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Representative Gail Lavielle was first elected in 2010 to represent Connecticut’s 143rd House district, which includes parts of Norwalk, Westport, and Wilton. She is Assistant Minority Leader, Ranking Member of the legislature’s Education Committee, and a member of the Finance and Transportation Committees. She also served as Commerce Committee Ranking Member and on the Appropriations and Higher Education Committees. Locally, she served on the Wilton Board of Finance and Wilton Energy Commission. Before entering public service, she worked for 26 years in finance and communications, holding executive leadership positions with Fortune 500 companies in the United States and France. She was also a music critic. She holds a Cornell BA, a Yale MA, and a UConn MBA. She is endorsed by the CT Realtors®, the CT League of Conservation Voters, The National Foundation for Independent Business, and Planned Parenthood, among other organizations. She received an Honor Roll designation from the CT Education Association (CEA) and the Gun Sense Candidate distinction from Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense. She and her husband Jean-Pierre live in Wilton.


What specific measures would you propose to balance the state budget? Please list up to three. 

Thomas (D. WF)

Balancing the budget is a problem that requires parties working together for the good of Connecticut. Solutions married with re-election plans and short-term time horizons will not work. There is not one easy answer to cut, tax, or grow out of Connecticut’s budget problem. Recoveries take years of progress. We need to put creative ideas on the table, give them fair consideration, and have the courage to implement innovative solutions.
One of these ideas is the Legacy Obligation Trust (LOT) model developed by a bi-partisan commission to help fund our pension liability. Through this model, state assets (i.e. vacant property and idle waterfront property sitting) would be transferred to an independently managed LOT to maximize its economic value.
We also need a comprehensive review of tax policy and existing loopholes and how tax increases or decreases will affect economic growth and the state’s ability to pay for services the state provides.
To save money, we should explore consolidating services currently fragmented across individual towns into regions to maximize efficiency through economies of scale.

Lavielle (R, I)

Connecticut faces a deficit of about $4.4 billion in the 2020-21 budget cycle, and $6.4 billion in the following cycle. Structural changes to state government’s ongoing operations are necessary: one-time spending cuts or revenues will have no lasting effect.
* Reforming state employee benefits, which cost 3x the national average as a percent of the budget, is key to stopping persistent deficits. Examples: replacing defined benefits with hybrid or defined contribution plans, raising the minimum retirement age, increasing active employees' share of pension contributions, eliminating overtime from base salary amounts used for pension calculations. This would require renegotiating the current contract, which must be on the table. Separately, the state’s annual required contributions to the teachers’ pension fund could possibly be lowered by redirecting lottery proceeds or monetizing state assets – proposals now under discussion.
* Exploring opportunities to privatize or outsource state functions to community nonprofits that would improve quality and cost-effectiveness.
* Reforming the state budget process to make spending subject to projected revenues. Currently, spending priorities are set before revenues are identified to pay for them.


What would you do to make Connecticut a more attractive state for new businesses to open in and for established companies to remain or move in?

Thomas (D. WF)

Businesses are attracted to states where they can recruit top talent. Small and large businesses alike experience difficulty finding the talent they need. Training the workforce for today’s -- and tomorrow’s -- jobs starts with our schools. I will prioritize meeting this need for a trained workforce by exploring all ideas, from training and apprenticeship programs to strategies to make college more affordable, such as loan-forgiveness programs or tuition assistance linked to post-graduate residency.
Reliable transportation and well-maintained roads are integral to attracting businesses to an area where many commute via public transportation and highways. I support a Transportation Fund Lockbox to ensure that revenue collected for transportation will only be spent on transportation needs.
Creating a small business-friendly environment is one of the best ways to rebuild the middle class. I will support small business creation with programs that encourage entrepreneurship while easing many of the permitting and regulation hurdles that stymie these efforts. I will also encourage the creation and growth of green technologies to provide new energy sources and reduce energy costs.

Lavielle (R, I)

* Regain business confidence by restoring Connecticut’s financial health.
* Implement a focused, purposeful economic development policy based on attracting new businesses with favorable fiscal and operating conditions, rather than on one-time incentives that don’t reduce overhead for the long term.
* Enact and sustain consistent tax and regulatory policy that allows businesses to make long-term plans without having to second-guess the future.
* Substantially improve alignment of study and training programs at colleges, universities, community colleges, and technical high schools with the recruitment needs (engineering, advanced manufacturing, etc.) of businesses operating in and interested in moving to Connecticut.
* Expedite permitting and registration processes and reduce payroll costs.
* Eliminate the estate tax, which affects family businesses particularly strongly.
* Restrain persistent legislative attempts to impose new, onerous mandates on businesses that constrain their ability to manage efficiently and control costs.
* Invest in transportation infrastructure. Improve the most heavily used systems like Metro-North, increase service at Bradley and Tweed airports, and optimize deep water ports.
* Actively communicate Connecticut’s new, business-friendly economic development policies nationwide and aggressively recruit new businesses.


Secretary of the State

Candidates are listed in the order in which they appear on the ballot. 

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Denise W Merrill

Democratic Party, Working Families Party

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Susan Chapman

Republican Party, Independent Party

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Heather Lynn Sylvestre Gwynn

Libertarian Party

S Michael DeRosa

Green Party

Treasurer

Candidates are listed in the order in which they appear on the ballot.

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Shawn Wouden

Democratic Party, 
Working Families Party

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Thad Gray

Republican Party, Independent Party

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Jesse Brohinsky

Libertarian Party

 

Comptroller

Candidates are listed in the order in which they appear on the ballot. 

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Kevin Lembo

Democratic Party, 
Working Families Party

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Kurt Miller

Republican Party, 
Independent Party

Edward G Heflin

Green Party

Paul Passarelli

Libertarian Party

Attorney General

Candidates are listed in the order in which they appear on the ballot. 

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William Tong

Democratic Party, 
Working Families Party

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Sue Hatfield

Republican Party, Independent Party

Peter D Goselin

Green Party

 

Judge of Probate

Candidates are listed in the order in which they appear on the ballot. 

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Lisa Wexler

Republican Party

Judge Lisa Wexler is an accomplished jurist. In the last 5 years, she has successfully managed over 13,000 matters in Probate Court, including estates, conservatorships, guardianships, mental health hearings, contested disputes and a host of other proceedings.

Judge Wexler has established a reputation for fairness, integrity and compassion. She has mastered the law and rendered her decisions with intelligence and heart. Her opinions have been published in law journals. Her experience and insight are invaluable to us as a community.

Judge Wexler keeps us informed of changes in the law via her widely-read newsletter. She teaches us and answers our questions by coming back to Town Hall on Tuesday nights. She regularly lectures at our Senior Centers. Her advocacy on behalf of the entire Probate Court system and her tireless work for the disadvantaged make her an indispensable part of the fabric of our social service network.

Registrar of Voters

Candidates are listed in the order in which they appear on the ballot. 

Richard Ruggiano

Republican Party

Marla J. Cowden

Democratic  Party

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Registrar of Voters since 2010. Served on the Secretary of the State’s Committee to develop procedures for the implementation of Election Day Registration. Developed a statewide program to test the capacity of the Connecticut Voter Registration System. Instructor at statewide election official conferences.  Through pilot programs and analysis has streamlined the election process and office procedures to reduce costs for Westport taxpayers. RTM member, 2 terms. On the townwide school building committee. Served as PTA and PTA Council Co-president. Commercial experience as CPA specializing in audit and process reengineering. As a member of the Registrars Technology Committee, I hope to continue working with the Secretary of the State’s office to create efficient, effective systems and procedures to enhance the experience of voters in Westport as well as statewide.

I have lived in Westport with my wife Kathleen and Son Ryan, for the past 28 years.  While much of my time was spent commuting to NYC, where I worked as a SVP for an international financial institution; I have always maintained an active life in our community.  Over the years I have served as a soccer and baseball coach, an Assistant Scout Master, a member of the Shriners, Scottish Rite, and a Trustee of Westport’s Masonic Lodge.  I enjoy playing golf in the summer months and volunteer with the Okemo Ski Patrol during the winter. I have worked with the Registrar of Voters Office in various capacities since 2012, and now look forward to expanding that relationship by working more closely with the Secretary of State’s Office in serving the great citizens of Westport.  I believe each and every one of us can make a difference and that stepping up to help matters.  Someone once said; “Volunteering is the ultimate exercise in Democracy, You vote in elections once a year, but when you volunteer, you vote every day about the kind of community you want to live in”

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